Difference between Bail and Parole

Key Difference: The term bail refers to paying a certain amount to the government in return of freedom before the date of the trial. A parole is really different from a bail. A parole happens after the accused has been given the sentence and set a jail time. A parole is when a person gets some time off from their jail sentence in order to fulfill some requirements.

Dealing with legal issues can be a scary process, mostly because of the various terminologies that is used by the legal departments. Certain terms may mean something completely different things than what they sound like. It is important to understand what different things mean, especially when it comes to legality issues.

Bail and parole are two such words that are often confusing for many people. There is a lot of talk about bail and parole, when a person is being convicted of a crime or even being accused of it. It is important to the difference between the terms, so it becomes easier to understand what one is agreeing to.

The term bail is something that is often thrown around by the media, but what does it exactly mean. It refers to paying a certain amount to the government in return of freedom before the date of the trial. When a person is being convicted of a crime, he is appointed a date by the judge for a trail. On the day of the trail, the person will fight his case in front of judge. Usually, a person can remain in the jail until this trial date approaches. However, the judge can decide to allow the person to pay a certain amount as insurance, suggesting that the person will show up at the trial. In many cases, the amount is repayable. The amount is decided by the preceding judge and is usually a set on a case by case basis.

For people who cannot pay this amount by themselves, there are institutions known as bail bonds that allow them to borrow the said amount to pay. The bail bonds will pay the bail, however, will charge the accused a certain percentage on the repayable amount. Refusing to pay the bail to the bondsman and not showing up at the trial after paying the bail, can result in jail time for the accused.

 A parole is really different from a bail. A parole happens after the accused has been given the sentence and set a jail time. A parole is when a person gets some time off from their jail sentence in order to fulfill some requirements. They can also receive parole, where their jail sentence is reduced, depending on the case. The accused must spend a significant amount of their sentence before they can apply for parole.

 For a person to receive the parole in the first scenario, there must be certain conditions such as sickness or death of a family or loved one, marriage of family member, delivery of a child of the wife of the accused, serious damage to life or property by a natural calamity, etc. In both cases, the convict or accused are provided with officers that they must keep in contact with regularly. In case, they are found of breaking rules or not reporting to their officers, the accused can end up back in jail.

Comparison between Bail and Parole:

 

Bail

Parole

Definition

The term bail refers to paying a certain amount to the government in return of freedom before the date of the trial. A parole is really different from a bail.

A parole is when a person gets some time off from their jail sentence in order to fulfill some requirements.

Payment

Requires a certain amount of payment in order to receive freedom

No money is required to be paid to anyone before freedom is awarded

Supervision

Requires no governmental supervision, but the person is expected to show up at the trial

Governmental supervision is required, where the parolee is expected to report to an officer

Awarded by

Judge

A panel

Before or after Trial

Before trial

After trail

Before or after Jail Time

Before Jail time

After jail time

Image Courtesy: bangordailynews.com, globalwrong.wordpress.com

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