Difference between Order and Ask

Key Difference: Order is a reliable instruction. It is also used as a command to a person. Ask is to obtain an answer or obtain an information for a particular thing.

We often need to know something immediately. If the particular talk is not known by itself, then the words like ‘order’ and ‘ask’ can really be very helpful.

According to Dictionary.com, ‘Order’ is:

  • An authoritative direction or instruction; command; mandate.
  • To direct or command to go or come as specified.
  • To regulate, conduct, or manage.

Order is a reliable instruction. It is used as a command for a person; and if someone is placing thing in order. For example: 'I placed the history books in chronological order', or, 'One can order a copy of the book; or one can wish to order something in the restaurant.' These are the few instances that one can use order in different ways.

According to Dictionary.com, ‘Ask’ is:

  • To put a question to; inquire of.
  • To request information about: to ask the way.
  • To try to get by using words; request: to ask advice; to ask a favor.

Ask is to obtain an answer or obtain an information for a particular thing. It is kind of a request to a person to get information. Asking is not just related to information or answer, one can also ask for the permission to do something. The synonyms of ask are: question, interrogate, beg, inquire, etc. Asking can be used in the context as a verb or a noun. In simple terms, asking is used to refer to a question. One can ask - anything to clarify doubts, to complete tasks, to talk to different people in order to find out something, to enquire about the health or well-being of, etc.

Comparison between Order and Ask:

 

Order

Ask

Definition

Order is a reliable instruction. It is also used as a command for a person.

Ask is to obtain an answer or obtain an information for a particular thing.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French ordre, from Latin ordo, ordin- 'row, series, rank'

Old English āscian, āhsian, āxian, of West Germanic origin

Main concept

Command or instruction

Obtain an answer

Obtain an information

Example

  • He was not going to take orders from a mere administrator.
  • I filed the books in alphabetical order.
  • I asked her what she meant.
  • Mary asked her father for money.

Type

Usually, noun

Usually, verb

Image Courtesy: divinesolution.org, thepicturebookteachersedition.blogspot.com

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