Difference between Sit-ups and Squats

Key Difference: Sit-ups and Squats are two different types of exercises. While both are strength training exercise, squats are primarily a favorite due to the fact that they target almost the entire lower back, whereas sit-ups target a specific group of muscles.

One may often hear the two terms ‘sit-ups’ and ‘squats’ being used, especially if they are attempting to exercise or go to a gym. Sit-ups and Squats are two different types of exercises. Their primary function it work out the muscles to make them lean and strong. The forms of the two exercises differ significantly.

Sit-ups: Start by lying on the floor, keeping the knees bent, and the arms across the chest or hands behind the head. Without moving the hips or legs, attempt to sit up, and then lie back down. Repeat.

Squats: Start by standing upright, legs spaced out, with or without weights. The arms can be kept on the sides, raised in front of the body, or behind the head. Some people even prefer to swing their arms as they go up and down. Now, slowly dip down to the floor (the dip can be to varied depths, however the most common is until the thighs are parallel to the floor). Slowly rise back up and repeat.

One of the most significant differences between the two, other than the form, is the different muscles they target. The sit-ups are primarily used for abdominal endurance training, as they strengthen core and abdominal muscles.

Squats, on the other hand, are a type of compound, full body exercise. It primarily trains the muscles of the thighs, hips and buttocks, quadriceps femoris muscle and hamstrings. It also helps strengthen the bones, ligaments and the insertion of the tendons throughout the lower body. Additionally, they help increase the strength and size of the legs and buttocks, in addition to developing core strength. Squats also helps train the lower back, the upper back, the abdominals, the trunk muscles, the costal muscles, and the shoulders and arms, as they are essential to properly doing a squat.

Another different between them is that while there are some variations available, the core form of the sit-up doesn’t change. However, there are various different types of squats available. One can do them as is, or use weights. One can do them freestanding, or against a wall for proper posture. In fact, even the depths to which one must dip can differ.

While both are strength training exercise, squats are primarily a favorite due to the fact that they target almost the entire lower back, whereas sit-ups target a specific group of muscles. Squats also provide a lot of variation, with each person have their own favorite variation. However, both exercise are nonetheless important for a whole body workout and hence are both included in a workout regime. After all, each has a significant purpose that the other does not fulfill.

 

Sit-ups

Squats

Function

Exercise

Exercise

Description

A type of floor exercise that is used for abdominal endurance training

A type of strength training and fitness exercise that a compound, full body exercise

Type of

Core strengthening exercise

Compound, full body exercise

Works

Abs and Core

Thighs, hips, buttocks, quadriceps femoris muscle, hamstrings, as well as strengthening the bones, ligaments and insertion of the tendons throughout the lower body. Strengthens core strength, the lower back, the upper back, the abdominals, the trunk muscles, the costal muscles, and the shoulders and arms.

Form

Lying on the floor

Standing upright

Exercise

Start by lying on the floor, keeping the knees bent, and the arms across the chest or hands behind the head. Without moving the hips or legs, attempt to sit up, and then lie back down. Repeat.

Start by standing upright, with or without weights.

Reference: Wikipedia (Sit-ups and Squats), Chron
Image Courtesy: popsugar.com, skinnywithfiber.org

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