Difference between Corn flour and Cornstarch

Key Difference: Corn flour and cornstarch are the same things. They are used for thickening agents. Corn flour is a powdery agent made from corn and comes in white and yellow color. On the other hand, cornstarch is another name for corn flour. The powder is used as a thickening agent in certain foods, providing twice the thickening power of corn flour.

Difference between Corn flour and CornstarchCorn flour and Cornstarch is one and the same thing. It depends on the location you live in. In the United States, people call it corn starch and in the United Kingdom; it is called corn flour. Both cornstarch and corn flour do the same thing, they thickened the food item. Cornflour is only made from fully grown corn while baby corn is different. (See the difference between corn and baby corn). Cornflour may me made from regular corn or sweet corn and used in different cuisines. (See the difference between corn and sweet corn).

Corn flour is a powdery flour, which comes in yellow and white color, and is used for breading and in combination with other flours in baking goods. In compare to cornstarch, using corn flour as a thickener, one needs to have the quantity of cornflour equal to two times. Lumps are accepted when corn flour is added, while in cornstarch it doesn’t usually create lumps.

Difference between Corn flour and CornstarchIn most cuisines, corn flour and cornstarch are used as thickening agents, i.e. usually to make a soup, broth or sauce thicker in consistency. While both are used for the same thing, however, only one thing is required at a time. When the cornflour and cornstarch both are mixed all together at the same time, it is accepted that a sauce or gravy will be thin. It will not be thicker and will be different in taste. Note that cornflour and corn starch are very finely ground so that they produce good emulsion like mixtures unline multigrain and whole wheat flours that have thickly ground flour. See the difference between multigrain and whole grain and whole wheat.  

 

Another name for cornstarch is corn flour. It is made from corn and is used as a thickening agent. It is pure starch and there is a lack of gluten which makes it more easy and efficient as a thickening agent for doughs and batters (See the difference between dough and batter). They are generally used to prevent eggs from curdling and are also helpful in the grounding of custards, cheesecakes, and puddings. It is basically a powdery starch that is made out of corn. It thickens very quickly and easily and forms a clear sauce after cooking. Cornstarch is mainly used in dairy products.

Comparison between Corn Flour and Cornstarch:

 

Corn Flour

Cornstarch

Description

Corn flour is a powdery agent made from corn and comes in white and yellow color.

Cornstarch's other name is corn flour. The powder is used as a thickening agent in certain foods, providing twice the thickening power of corn flour.

Gluten

The gluten in flour makes thickening agent less effective.

They add twice the thickening powder compared to flour.

Water

Corn flour is added with hot water.

Cornstarch is added to cold water.

Produce

Its blend leaves a cloudy look

It produces a shiny or glossy look.

Made from

Corn

Corn

Also see: The difference between Corn and Maze

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Comments

Well this was a pointless comparison. I'm still none the wiser whether they're the same or not. Does no one proof read this shit before hand?

the difference I can see is that corn flower you mix with hot water and corn starch mix with h cold water. corn flower will make a sauce that's cloudy where corn sta\rch makes a clear sauce. I accidently mixedcold water with corn flower and had to add more water as it started to go hard. also corn flour tends to go lumpy where as corn starch dosent

See comment by Katia above.

So the article says both that they are the same thing with different names, then names differences in their use? Either they are the same thing, or they are not?

Phew, I thought it was just me. This article keeps stating that they are one and the same and then describing their appearance and uses differently,very frustrating indeed. Time to surf elsewhere.

Very true... *sighs*

Thank you for this information

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